Tag Archives: 2000

King Solomon’s TARDIS, and other arguments

Tides25_0001ccWorking backwards again, I’ve now added a PDF of issue 25 of Tides of Time, published early in 2000, to the website, It’s a large file as these scans go, of 25Mb or so, but is worth it. Matthew Peacock edited this one, and was responsible for the major piece of fiction in it, ‘Jacob’s Ladder’, which Fiona Moore and Alan Stevens later cited in one of their academic articles on Doctor Who. Fiona herself writes for this issue, including looking at theexoticism and de-exoticisation of the primitive across twenty-six years of Doctor Who, on Lawrence Miles’s novel Alien Bodies as an allegory for Doctor Who as cultural commodity in the 1990s, and about the crisis of relevance which affected the programme in the 1980s. There’s a great piece on childhood memories and meeting Elisabeth Sladen by Mark Boyes, and a survey of the history of the magazine by me, as well as gossip, in-jokes, out-jokes and other fiction.

In the interests of variety, I had a go at tinting the cover illustrations for this edition, in an attempt to exploit the shortcomings of the photocopies I used as masters. I apologise in advance for the eye strain.

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Millennial reflections: Tides of Time 26, Trinity Term 2000

Tides26Your archivist is suffering from a cold and has spent much of the last couple of days in bed; what work he has been able to do has not made as much sense as he would like, and he has therefore turned to the crafting of a new PDF. Welcome, therefore, to the internet issue 26 of Tides of Time, published in late spring 2000, and edited by Matthew Peacock. It’s a very strong mixture of material, including some of my favourite articles from the entire run, such as David Bickley’s confessions of explaining your fandom at job interviews (I’ve been there too), Fiona Moore’s ‘Continuity – A Modest Proposal’, Al Harrison’s look at the works of J.G. Ballard and Matthew Peacock’s own piece on the rail yards at Barry, unaware that in just over four years Doctor Who, revived, would be filming there. There’s fiction of the adventurous and traditional sorts too, all very much reflecting the era of BBC Books original fiction and showing great affection for the eighth and sixth doctors in particular, though there is an early Big Finish review examining then producer Gary Russell’s policies and how releases such as The Spectre of Lanyon Moor support them.

If you’ve not already downloaded the issue, you can do so here.

There’s also a contents listing for the issue in an earlier post.